A Tale of Thanksgiving Dinner

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A Tale of Thanksgiving Dinner

Celebrated on the fourth Thursday in November, Thanksgiving is one of the quintessentially American holidays. It is an example of a harvest festival, and was originally a day of religious observance. Before what we typically think of as the first Thanksgiving in 1621, several other celebratory feasts for giving thanks to God occurred among European settlers in North America.

The below, is a personal account from Cyprus, one of our current interns from the USA about the Thanksgiving she has memories of growing up with and one, that this year, she will miss out on thanks to her internship.

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Larder Love: A History of Jams & Preserves

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Larder Love: A History of Jams & Preserves

Whether you call it jam, jelly or preserve – this delicious treat is another traditional method of larder preservation. From the very proper English scones with jam and cream to your humble jam on toast, this old favourite is enjoyed worldwide by people from all walks of life.

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Feature Plant Friday: Poppy

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Feature Plant Friday: Poppy

In honour of the 100 years since Armistice Day, this week we are taking a look at the history of the poppy, which is well-known for its significance as a flower of remembrance. Poppies also have an extensive history across cultures as a symbolic, medicinal, and culinary plant, and have played an important role in the economies of many countries for thousands of years.

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Celebrating Sustainably - Green Lantern for Diwali

Celebrating Sustainably - Green Lantern for Diwali

Billions of households across the world are abuzz with activity and excitement. Diwali, the Hindu festival of lights, is just around the corner. And so are the elaborate preparations: shopping for new clothes, preparing sweets and savouries for family and friends, spring cleaning the house, and planning for all the fun and frolic this festival entails. But how can we celebrate more sustainably? Read on to find out.

Feature Plant Friday - Celebrating El Día de los Muertos with Marigolds

Feature Plant Friday - Celebrating El Día de los Muertos with Marigolds

To continue celebrating El Día de los Muertos, or ‘Days of the Dead’, this week we’re taking a look at marigolds. Marigolds are an important plant in not just this yearly festival, but across many other cultures now and throughout history, and did you know that they are edible too?

Food & culture - Part 1

Food & culture - Part 1

This week, one of our wonderful interns who is visiting from America, Madalena Tran, has gone on a journey of discovery whilst with FoodFaith, investigating people’s food preferences and how their cultures have impacted on this - something integral to FoodFaith.

Larder Love - Dehydrating for your Larder

Larder Love - Dehydrating for your Larder

The modern fridge may have spelt doom for the traditional kitchen larder for countless decades, but many of us now find ourselves seeking out the simple creative food legacies of the old-fashioned larder. In our series on Larder Love we hope you discover along your own journey.

Following on from our article on the Ancient Art of Pickling we brought you last month, we thought we’d step back in time to the historical food preservation method of dehydration.

Feature Plant Friday - Spanish Olives on Spanish National Day

Feature Plant Friday - Spanish Olives on Spanish National Day

With Spanish National Day today, we’re taking a look at Spanish Olives. Typically pictured as large olives stuffed with peppers, Spanish olives vary in colour from green to black and by region, but did you know that Spanish olives only differ from other olives by their preparation?

Breaking Bread with FoodFaith & Good Food Month

Breaking Bread with FoodFaith & Good Food Month

On Tuesday October 9th, from 12 - 2pm, FoodFaith was proud to host Breaking bread - The Panel with the help of Good Food Month at Hyde Park Palms in Sydney’s Hyde Park.

The discussion, featuring a diverse panel of experts and a special video message from Indigenous historian Professor Bruce Pascoe, was an interesting and incredibly important discourse on bread, one of our first staple foods.

Are You Breaking Bread with Us??

Are You Breaking Bread with Us??

Next week, FoodFaith will host Breaking Bread - The Panel. In case you haven’t had a chance to read all about it, click here, but for some extra info (and a sneaky discount code), take a look below at some of the topics we’ll be discussing and some profiles of our moderator and speakers.

Feature Plant Friday - Kangaroo Wheat Grass

Feature Plant Friday - Kangaroo Wheat Grass

As one of the 150 documented species of native grasses in Australia, kangaroo grass has been a key crop for Indigenous and broader Australian agriculture for thousands of years and is one of the most widely distributed grasses in the country!

How to be Label Conscious: Choosing Sustainable Certifications Made Easy

How to be Label Conscious: Choosing Sustainable Certifications Made Easy

In today’s increasingly savvy society, consumers are becoming more aware that the products we purchase not only contribute to the wellbeing of us as individuals but to the wellbeing of the wider community and to the global environment. To get on board with the myriad of product labels out there, let’s take a closer look at some certifications you will come across in the Australian retail landscape.

Breaking Bread - The Panel

Breaking Bread - The Panel

Bread, as a symbol of community, sharing and connection to land, is the focus of a Sydney Friends of Good Food Month and FoodFaith event in Hyde Park in October. FoodFaith has been working with Good Food Month, the City of Sydney and UTS for this event which showcases the many cultural, spiritual and environmental connections bread has.

Feature Plant Friday - What You Need to Know About Yeast

Feature Plant Friday - What You Need to Know About Yeast

With Breaking Bread - The Panel, FoodFaith’s discussion on the history, culture and sustainable future of bread on October 9th as part of the Sydney friends of Good Food Month, today, we’re taking a look at yeast. One of the key components in baking for thousands of years, but did you know that yeast isn't actually a plant?

Larder Love - The Ancient Art of Pickling

Larder Love - The Ancient Art of Pickling

Last month we started looking at the notion of larder love and what we can all learn from the old-school larder’s traditional techniques. Here we continue the series by exploring the ancient art of pickling.

Celebrating Sustainably - A Sweet & Green Rosh Hashanah

Celebrating Sustainably - A Sweet & Green Rosh Hashanah

Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year starts on September 9 and is to be celebrated until sundown on September 11, this year. An opportunity for good food and fun with family and friends, this festival also is a time for looking inwards -- to reflect upon your actions over the past year and seek tshuva (repentance) and forgiveness for any wrongdoings. Let the noise of the shofar be loud enough to wake you up to a more conscientious and sustainable way of life with our suggestions below.

Feature Plant Friday - Apples and their Sweet History

Feature Plant Friday - Apples and their Sweet History

While ‘an apple a day’ has been keeping doctors away since the origin of the proverb in 1860s Wales, apples have a rich history in culture, medicine, and cooking that spans across the world and over thousands of years. Originating in Kazakhstan, apples now come in over 7,500 varieties, or cultivars, most of which can be traced back to their original parents!

Celebrating Sustainably - A Green Day for Dad

Celebrating Sustainably - A Green Day for Dad

Father’s Day is just around the corner. And if like every year you are going eeny, meeny, miny, mo between wallet, shaving kit, perfume, tie, or “World’s Best Dad” coffee mug as a gift for your dad, do your old man a favour. Stop right there. He might not tell it to your face but all he wants is “not” to get one of those gifts, for a change. Keep reading for some of our top tips and ideas.

An Introduction: The Bahá’í Faith

An Introduction: The Bahá’í Faith

The Bahá’í Faith was established in 1863 in Iran by Baháʹuʹlláh (which means Glory of God in Arabic). This religion originates from an earlier, smaller faith called Bábísm. Bábísm was founded by Ali-Muhammed or “Báb”, and foretold of the mission of a prophet who would follow Muhammed - Baháʹuʹlláh proclaimed himself as this prophet and subsequently The Bahá’í Faith was born.